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    Become Your Child’s Partner in Reading!
    Read to Your Child Each Day!
     
    Did You Know?

     

    Young children who have good vocabularies and who are taught early reading skills before they start school are more likely to become good readers and achieve academic success throughout their school careers.

     

    Betty Hart and Todd Risley (1984) conducted a study on children and noted that by the time children are three years old, there is a major difference in the vocabularies of certain groups of children.

     

    Cumulative Vocabulary (Hart & Risley)

    Group A Children

    500 words

    Group B Children

    700 words

    Group C Children

    1,100 words

     

    The Carnegie Institute found that only half of infants and toddlers are read to by their parents.  Reading to your child each day can help to increase your child’s vocabulary considerably and can give your child a great start before starting school.

     

    Make sure you have a print-rich environment in your home.  Check out books at the library for your child to read.  Go to the dollar store and buy books for your child to read.  Place books in a crate or box or on book shelves in the home so that children can reach them with ease.

     

    Place your child on your lap and read to him/her each day.  Not only are you developing critical skills your child will need before school starts, you are also creating a nurturing environment that lends itself to bonding with your child.

     

    Start by reading nursery rhymes to your child each and every day.  Research tells us that children who can recite at least two nursery rhymes by the time they reach kindergarten have the potential to become very good readers.  Pretty soon, you will notice that your child can recite these nursery rhymes without your help.  Here are two simple nursery rhymes you can start with:
     
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are.
    Up above the world so high,
    Like a diamond in the sky.
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are.
     

    Or, for older preschool children try this:

     

    1,  2,  Buckle my shoe;

     

    3  ,4    Shut the door;

     

    5,  6   Pick up the sticks;

     

    7,  8    Lay them straight;

     

    9,  10   A big fat hen.

     

    Make up your own rhymes with your child as you go about your day.  How about, “the cat in the hat had fun in the sun”!
     
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    Do you want to do your part in helping to prepare your child for kindergarten?
     
    TALKING TO PRESCHOOL CHILDREN BUILDS THEIR VOCABULARY
     
    Parents play a critical role in the language and intellectual development of their children.  The following study shows the results of talking to children often:
     
           Cumulative Vocabulary Experiences in Everyday Interactions at Home 

     

     
    Families

    Average words heard per hour

    Words heard in a 100 hour week

    Words heard in a 5,200 hour year

    Number of words heard by age 3

    Group A

    620

    62,000

    3 million

    10 million

    Group B

    1,250

    125,000

    6 million

    20 million

    Group C

    2,150

    215,000

    11 million

    30 million*

     

     

           Hart, B. & Risley, T.R. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company. (p.132)
     
    *The children in Group C will have a distinct advantage upon entering kindergarten.  Young children who have good vocabularies and who are taught early reading skills before they start school are more likely to become good readers and achieve academic success throughout their school careers.
     
    Talk, Talk, Talk, Talk to your child EVERYDAY...ALL DAY!!
     
     
     
     
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Last Modified on October 18, 2016