• Multiple Intelligences Chart

     

    Here is a list of activities that speak to each intelligence.

    Verbal-Linguistic

    Logical-Mathematical

    Visual-Spatial

    Bodily-Kinesthetic

    choral speaking

    declarizing

    storytelling

    retelling

    speaking

    debating

    presenting

    reading aloud

    dramatizing

    book making

    nonfiction reading

    researching

    listening

    process writing

    writing journals

    problem solving

    measuring

    coding

    sequencing

    critical thinking

    predicting

    playing logic games

    collecting data

    experimenting

    solving puzzles

    classifying

    using manipulatives

    learning the scientific model

    using money

    using geometry

     

     

     

    graphing

    photographing

    making visual metaphors

    making visual analogies

    mapping stories

    making 3D projects

    painting

    illustrating

    using charts

    using organizers

    visualizing

    sketching

    patterning

    visual puzzles

    hands on experiments

    activities

    changing room arrangement

    creative movement

    going on field trips

    physical education activities

    crafts

    dramatizing

    using cooperative groups

    dancing

     

    Musical

    Interpersonal

    Intrapersonal

    Naturalistic

    humming

    rapping

    playing background music

    patterns

    form

    playing instruments

    tapping out poetic rhythms

    rhyming

    singing

    classroom parties

    peer editing

    cooperative learning

    sharing

    group work

    forming clubs

    peer teaching

    social awareness

    conflict mediation

    discussing

    cross age tutoring

    study group

    brainstorming

    personal response

    individual study

    personal goal setting

    individual projects

    journal log keeping

    personal choice in projects

    independent reading

    reading outside

    cloud watching

    identifying insects

    building habitats

    identifying plants

    using a microscope

    dissecting

    going on a nature walk

    build a garden

    studying the stars

    bird watching

    collecting rocks

    making bird feeders

    going to the zoo

     


    Activity Chart for Multiple Intelligences

    Linguistic Intelligence

    Use storytelling to explain
    Conduct a debate on
    Write a poem, myth, legend, short play, or news article about
    Create a talk show radio program about
    Conduct an interview on

    Logical-Mathematical Intelligence

    Translate into a mathematical formula
    Design and conduct an experiment on
    Make up syllogisms to demonstrate
    Make up analogies to explain
    Describe the patterns or symmetry in
    Others of your choice

    Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

    Create a movement or sequence of movements to explain
    Make task or puzzle cards for
    Build or construct a
    Plan and attend a field trip that will
    Bring hands-on materials to demonstrate

    Visual Intelligence

    Chart, map, cluster, or graph
    Create a slide show, videotape, or photo album of
    Create a piece of art that demonstrates
    Invent a board or card game to demonstrate
    Illustrate, draw, paint, sketch, or sculpt

    Musical Intelligence

    Give a presentation with appropriate musical accompaniment on
    Sing a rap or song that explains
    Indicate the rhythmical patterns in
    Explain how the music of a song is similar to
    Make an instrument and use it to demonstrate

    Interpersonal Intelligence

    Conduct a meeting to address
    Intentionally use social skills to learn about
    Participate in a service project to
    Teach someone about
    Practice giving and receiving feedback on Use technology to

    Intrapersonal Intelligence

    Describe qualities you possess that will help you successfully complete
    Set and pursue a goal to
    Describe one of your personal values about
    Write a journal entry on
    Assess your own work in

    Naturalist Intelligence

    Create observation notebooks of
    Describe changes in the local or global environment
    Care for pets, wildlife, gardens, or parks
    Use binoculars, telescopes, microscopes, or magnifiers to
    Draw or photograph natural objects


    Key Points in Multiple Intelligences Theory

    Beyond the descriptions of the eight intelligences and their theoretical underpinnings, certain points of the model are important to remember:

    1.   Each person possesses all eight intelligences. Of course, the intelligences function together in ways unique to each person. Most of us fall somewhere in between two poles -- being highly developed in some intelligences, modestly developed in others, and relatively underdeveloped in the rest.

    2.   Most people can develop each intelligence to an adequate level of competency. Although an individual may complain about his deficiencies in a given area and consider his problems innate and intractable, Howard Gardner suggests that virtually everyone has the capacity to develop all eight intelligences to a reasonably high level of performance if given the appropriate encouragement, enrichment, and instruction.

    3.   Intelligences usually work together in complex ways. Gardner points out that no intelligence exists by itself in life (except perhaps in very rare instances in savants and brain-injured individuals). Intelligences are always interacting with each other. To cook a meal, one must read the recipe (linguistic), possibly divide the recipe in half (logical-mathematical), develop a menu that satisfies all members of a family (interpersonal), and placate one's own appetite as well (intrapersonal). Similarly, when a child plays a game of kickball, he needs bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (to run, kick, and catch), spatial intelligence (to orient himself to the playing field and to anticipate the trajectories of flying balls), and linguistic and interpersonal intelligences (to successfully argue a point during a dispute in the game).

    4.   There are many ways to be intelligent within each category. A person may not be able to read, yet be highly linguistic because he can tell a terrific story or has a large oral vocabulary. Similarly, a person may be quite awkward on the playing field, yet possess superior bodily-kinesthetic intelligence when she weaves a carpet or creates an inlaid chess table. MI theory emphasizes the rich diversity of ways in which people show their gifts within intelligences as well as between intelligences.