• Study Resources
     Below are links to quizlet, online interactive sites and powerpoints that we discussed in class. 

    Quizlet  

    1. Classification (click here)
    2. Classification Part 2 (click here)
    3. Domains and Kingdoms Quiz (click here)

     

    Videos

    1. All About Cells (click here)
    2. Characteristics of Living Things (click here)
    3. The History of Cell Theory (click here)
    4. Euglena -  (click here)
    5. 6 Kingdoms of Life (click here)

    6.  Protists and Fungi (click here)


    Web Quests

    1.  Practice Naming the Parts of the Microscope (click here)
    2. Bacterial Cell Interactive (click here)
    3. Animal Cell Interactive (click here)
    4. Plant Cell Interactive (click here)

    5. Plant Cell Jigsaw Puzzle (click here)
    6. Choose your Jigsaw Puzzle (click here)

    7.  A Virtual Pond Dip (click here)
    8.  Amoeba Lab - watch the video (click here)
    9. Paramecium Lab - watch the video click here)
    10.  Euglena Lab- watch the video (click here)


    Powerpoints:

    1. Cell Theory Notes (click here)
    2. 
    Unicellular and Multicellular Organisms 
    ​                       (click here)
    3. Classify Cells as  Prokaryotic  or Eukaryotic
                          (click here)
    4. Domains / Kingdoms  Foldable (click here)
    5. Jeopardy for Classification Review (click here)

    Learning Objectives & Essential Questions

    Standards: S7L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to investigate the diversity of living organisms and how they can be compared 

    scientifically. a. Develop and defend a model that categorizes organisms based on common characteristics. b. Evaluate historical models of how 

    organisms were classified based on physical characteristics and how that led to the six kingdom system (currently archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi,

     plants, and animals). (Clarification statement: This includes common examples and characteristics such as, but not limited to, prokaryotic, eukaryotic, 

    unicellular, multicellular, asexual reproduction, sexual reproduction, autotroph, heterotroph, and unique cell structures. Modern classification will be 

    addressed in high school.)

     

    Learning Targets: 

    • I can identify characteristics used to classify organisms. (Knowledge) 

    • I can identify past models of the classification system of organisms. (Knowledge)  

    • I can analyze the physical features used to classify organisms to determine how classification systems have changed over time and led to the six kingdom system.  (Reasoning)

     

     Biotic vs Abiotic Factors

    DISCOVERY FILE: Abiotic and Biotic Factors

     Many factors influence every part of our environment: things like how tall trees grow, where animals and plants are found, and why birds migrate. There are two categories of these factors: abiotic and biotic.

     Abiotic factors are the non-living parts of the environment that can often have a major influence on living organisms. Abiotic factors include water, sunlight, oxygen, soil and temperature.

     Water (H2O) is a very important abiotic factor – it is often said that “water is life.” All living organisms need water. Plants must have water to grow. Even plants that live in the desert need a little bit of water to grow. Without water, animals become weak and confused, and they can die if they do not rehydrate. Think of how you feel after you take a long run. Do you feel thirsty? This is your body signaling to you that you must rehydrate.

     Sunlight is the main source of energy on Earth, which makes it an extremely important abiotic factor. Sunlight is necessary for photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide (CO2) and water to oxygen (O2) and sugar – food for the plants that later becomes food for animals. Without the sun, plants could not live, and without plants, animals could not live! The sun’s heat is also extremely important – see the section on Temperature below.

    Like water, oxygen (O2) is another important abiotic factor for many living organisms. Without oxygen, humans would not be able to live! This is true for the many other living organisms that use oxygen.  Oxygen is produced by green plants through the process of photosynthesis, and is therefore directly linked to sunlight.

    Soil is often considered an abiotic factor since it is mostly made up of small particles of rock (sand and clay) mixed with decomposed plants and animals. Plants use their roots to get water and nutrients from the soil. Soils are different from place to place – this can be a big factor in which plants and animals live in a certain area.

    Temperature is an abiotic factor that is strongly influenced by sunlight. Temperature plays an important role for animals that cannot regulate their own body temperature, such as reptiles. Unlike humans, whose normal body temperature is usually around 98.6°F, reptiles (such as snakes and lizards) cannot maintain a constant body temperature. Reptiles are usually found in warm regions around the planet. To regulate their body temperatures, reptiles will sun themselves on rocks, which absorb heat from sunlight and then radiate heat back into the environment.

    Biotic factors are all of the living things in an ecosystem, such as plants and animals. These living things interact with one another in many ways. Biotic factors and their interactions can be broken down into three groups:

    1. Producers. All plants, such as grass and trees, are producers. These organisms absorb the sun’s energy and convert the energy into food for themselves, allowing them to grow larger, make flowers and seeds, etc.
    2. Consumers. These organisms, mostly animals, eat producers and/or other animals. They may also eat decomposers. Two examples of consumers are deer (eat plants) and wolves (eat animals). Consumers that only eat plants (herbivores) are often known as primary consumers.
    3. Decomposers. These organisms break down dead material (such as a fallen tree) into soil and return nutrients to the soil so they can be re-used by producers to create food. An example of a decomposer is a mushroom.

    Living non living  

     
    Living Things | Science Song for Kids | Elementary Life Science ...   
     
    Classification Introduction Powerpoint ( Click Here) 
    Classification of Life (Click Here)
     
     
    Vocabulary Terms 
    Organism
    Cell
    Homeostasis
    Phylogeny
    Kingdom
    Phylum
    Class
    Order        
    Family
    Genus
    Species
    Binomial Nomenclature
    Spontaneous generation
    Biogenesis
     
     
     
     Kingdoms
     
    Kingdom and Dichotomous Keys Guided Reading (Click Here)
     

    RESOURCES

    STATE STANDARD: S7L1 CLASSIFICATION 

    Characteristics of Living Things
    1. Characteristics of Living Things Video
    2. Characteristics of Living Things Interactive Ppt. 
    3. Reproduction: Asexual vs. Sexual Video 
    4. Study Guide & Self-Assessment with QR 
    5. Basic Necessities of Life Video 

    Levels of Classification
    1. Classification Vocabulary Interactive Ppt. 
    2. Levels of Classification Video
    3. Levels of Classification Video (BrainPop requires login; find info here
    4. Explore the 6 Kingdoms Interactive Notes 
    5. Kingdoms Video
    6. Classification Game 
    7. Classification Notes Link 
    8. Classification Song with Lyrics Video ​ 
    9. Study Guide & Self-Assessment with QR Codes
    10. Classification Notes Link

    Dichotomous Key
    1. Basic Dichotomous Key Tutorial Video


    S7L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to investigate the diversity of living organisms and how they can be compared scientifically.
    a. Develop and defend a model that categorizes organisms based on common characteristics. 
    b. Evaluate historical models of how organisms were classified based on physical characteristics and how that led to the six kingdom system (currently archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals). 
    ​(Clarification statement: This includes common examples and characteristics such as, but not limited to, prokaryotic, eukaryotic, unicellular, multicellular, asexual reproduction, sexual reproduction, autotroph, heterotroph, and unique cell structures. Modern classification will be addressed in high school.) 
     
     

    Vocabulary


    Animalia

    Archaea
    Archaebacteria
    asexual reproduction
    autotrophic
    Bacteria

    cell
    cell membrane
    cell wall
    chloroplast
    classification

    DNA
    Domain eukaryotic
    Eukarya
    Eubacteria
    Fungi
    genetic material
    heterotrophic
    Kingdom multicellular

    nucleus
    organelle 
    Plantae
    Protista
    prokaryotic
    sexual reproduction
    taxonomic
    classification
    taxonomy
    unicellular