• Welcome!
    Teacher Name:  Summer Watson
    School Email Address:  Summer.Watson@henry.k12.ga.us________________________________________
     
     
     
    Welcome to my web page! I would like to offer some accelerated learning opportunities for you during our remote learning period. Below are some possible links and activities to help enrich your learning. If you need anything, please email me. I will be very happy to hear from you. Do your best work while you are at home and enjoy time with your family. Links and activities are sorted per grade level, but feel to use the resources that you feel are relevant to your learning.
     
     
     
     
    Logic Puzzles - Email me at swatson@henry.k12.ga.us and I will email you some logic puzzles that are fun and challenging!

    Even More Cites during Remote Learning - These sites include more virtual field trips, virtual travel and virtual museums, and even games for game nights!

     

     Kindergarten Fun

    ELA - Shades of Meaning - Ask your child to think of as many words as he/she can regarding a specific action (e.g. crawl, walk, jog, trot, run, sprint). Write the words on slips of paper and help your child organize them. For example, the words above are organized from slowest to fastest. a. Help increase your child’s vocabulary by adding in and explaining related words of your own. b. Help your child to consider how the words are different by discussing how each one might impact a character in a story. For example, what if Goldilocks could only crawl? What if she could only sprint? Would the story be different?

    Organizing Spices – Alphabetize the spices (or canned goods, boxes, etc. ) in your kitchen. Then, organize them smallest to largest. Put them back in an organized way. Explain your system and why it works. Discuss with your child other ways to organize the materials and have him/her defend their opinion on which is the best one.

    Compare and Contrast - Retell a familiar nursery rhyme, children’s story, or fairytale to your child. If you have access to books, read aloud and ask your child to follow along. For example, tell the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears or The Three Little Pigs. a. Have your child tell you all of the similarities and differences between the characters. Think about how the author describes characters as well as characters’ actions, thoughts, feelings… b. Have your child write/tell you an alternate ending to the story, or tell what he/she might have done in a similar situation. Have them explain their thinking. 

    Shades of Meaning - Ask your child to think of as many words as he/she can regarding a specific action (e.g. crawl, walk, jog, trot, run, sprint). Write the words on slips of paper and help your child organize them. For example, the words above are organized from slowest to fastest. a. Help increase your child’s vocabulary by adding in and explaining related words of your own. b. Help your child to consider how the words are different by discussing how each one might impact a character in a story. For example, what if Goldilocks could only crawl? What if she could only sprint? Would the story be different?

    Animal Riddles – Guide your children through the process of writing riddles about animals.

    a. Share this riddle with your child: I have soft feathers. I have two legs. I can fly. What am I?

    b. After your child correctly guesses that this riddle describes a bird, as your child to identify the clues that helped him or her solve it. Guide your child to see that the riddle contains clues about the animal’s covering, its legs, and its way of moving.

    c. Have your child compose other animal riddles using this model. Provide help as needed.

    d. Have your child draw each animal, adding captions with the animal’s names.

    Guess the Animal - Have someone describe an animal to you without telling you the name; then, draw an animal that matches the description. Does it look like the animal? Did you guess it?

    1st Grade

    - Practice Sight Words with Art Activities https://www.ateachableteacher.com/using-art-to-teach-sight-words/

    This site offers creative ways for your students to practice sight words at home.
     
     
     
    Logic Puzzles - Please email me at swatson@henry.k12.ga.us and I will forward you some fun logic puzzles!
     

    More Fun for 1st Grade

     

    Tower Power – Use materials around your house to build the tallest towers you can build. Use blocks if you have them, but also challenge yourself to use creative materials like foil, spaghetti noodles, balloons, or old shoe boxes. Measure each tower you build and create a chart that lists the different materials you used and the height of each tower you created. Consider which materials enabled you to build the tallest tower or the sturdiest tower. Going further: Can you make a tower that is taller than you are? Can you make a tower that will hold a small stuffed animal?

     

    ELA - Exact Instructions Challenge: Have your child create a set of instructions for how to do an everyday task. Then attempt to follow the instructions, doing ONLY what is stated on the page. For example, if the task is to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, but the directions do not state to get out a plate, don’t start with a plate. After attempting to follow your child’s instructions, talk with your child about how to improve the instructions and help him/her rewrite the instructions. Going further: Create a set of instructions for your child and have him/her follow them in the same way. Have him/her help you edit your instructions to make them more clear.

    Exploding the Moment: A narrative is a piece of writing that connects a series of events to tell a story. In this activity, your child will follow a process to add rich details and language to narrative writing.

    a. Have your child write a short narrative of their favorite memory.

    b. After your child completes the narrative, ask him or her to select a simple sentence from the narrative and write it on another sheet of paper. Then, have your child use the prompts below to think of as many details as possible to “explode the moment” depicted in the sentence. Have your child write additional sentences with these details below the original sentence. 

    Use your five senses: 1. SEE: Who is in the scene? What do they look like? What are they wearing? What are they doing? What action do you notice? What do your surroundings look like? 2. HEAR: What are people saying? What sounds fill your ears? 3. TOUCH: What is the air like? What do your surroundings feel like? What textures and sensations do you notice? What physical sensations do you experience? 4. SMELL: What scents are in the air around you? 5. TASTE: What tastes do you experience? 

    Capture your thoughts: What was going through your head in this one moment? 

    To go even further, try to paint a picture with words by making a comparison. Here are some examples of similes:

                          1. The car was as fast as lightning.

                          2. Her feet were as ___________ as a ___________________ .

                          3. The stereo _____________ like a ____________________ .

                          4. I felt like a ______________ who had _________________.

     

    c. Have your child rewrite the story, including the additional details from the exploded moment.

     

    Create a Book – Have your child create a book highlighting all of the cool activities your family has been involved in for the last two weeks, both school related and family related. The book should demonstrate understanding of the basic features of printed text such as title, author’s name, table of contents, headings, subheadings, visual data such as charts/graphs, pictures and captions, glossary, and index.

    Plant Poems – Ask your child to draw a picture of a plant. Have your child brainstorm “plant” words such as roots, stems, leaves, air, sunlight, water, and soil. Have your child write the words around the picture. Finally, ask your child to use the “plant” words to write poems about plants.

    2nd Grade - Environmental Changes

    Environmental Changes : Read "One Plastic Bag" (or listen to) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_B6p04Zph04
    Watch the Trash to Treasure Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r354rs7aYzI
    Plan your own use for Plastic Bags. How could you recycle plastic bags for a useful purpose. 
     
     
    What is an invasive invader? What happens when invasive species take over? 
     
    Shadow Science Review – Have your child plan and conduct an investigation to answer these questions: Can your shadow ever appear longer than you are tall? Can your shadow disappear? Students should gather data and then write an answer to the question in which they explain their findings.
    Share your ideas with me at summer.watson@henry.k12.ga.us
     

    Tower Power – Use materials around your house to build the tallest towers you can build. Use blocks if you have them, but also challenge yourself to use creative materials like foil, spaghetti noodles, balloons, or old shoe boxes. Measure each tower you build and create a chart that lists the different materials you used and the height of each tower you created. Consider which materials enabled you to build the tallest tower or the sturdiest tower. Going further: Can you make a tower that is taller than you are? Can you make a tower that will hold a small stuffed animal?

    Comparing Plants – Compare means “to tell how things are the same and different.” Select two plants from your home, yard, or neighborhood to compare. Observe the plants closely. Consider size, shape, color, length of life cycle, seeds, flowers, and any other details you observe. Then, use a Venn diagram to record your comparisons.

    Comparing Animals – Select two animals that you either know a lot about or can observe. Compare the animals. Consider size, color, covering (fur, feathers, etc.), life cycle, and any other details you know or observe about the animals. Use a Venn diagram to record your observations.

     

    3rd Grade - Advanced Learning Opportunities that are Non- Digital

    ELA - Fun with Fables!  Have your child read, write, illustrate, and act out fables. Discuss morals and life lessons found in the fables. Tap into your child’s imagination and creativity!
     
    Picture Prompts – Find an interesting picture in a photo album or book you have at home. Have your child use this image as inspiration for his or her own writing - an imaginative story, a poem, a memory...

    Puppet Tales – Have your child design and create puppets to represent the characters in a favorite story. Use the puppets to retell the story. 

    Fun with Fables! – Have your child read, write, illustrate, and act out fables. Discuss morals and life lessons found in the fables. Tap into your child’s imagination and creativity!  

    Be a Novelist – Share the following activity with students: Imagine something mysterious has happened at your house. It could involve your pets, your family members, or even your toys (think Toy Story). Write the story of the mystery, using as many physical and sensory details as you can. But, don’t give away the answer to the mystery until the very end. Keep the reader in suspense!

    Be a Reporter – Share the following activity with students: Imagine you are a reporter, trying to uncover the mystery you told in the story above. Create an article for an online news source.

    4th Grade-

    Advanced Learning Opportunities that are Non- Digital

    Holy Science, Batman! – Have students consider the following questions:

    Why is Batman able to see the Bat Signal from across the city? Is it scientifically possible for the Bat Signal to work, or is it just a comic book effect?  Imagine a symbol that represents your superpower and create a Bat Signal of your own. Can your signal be seen from very far away? Why or why not? 

    Spaced Out – The space between planets is a vacuum, which means it is completely empty, with no air or gas or matter of any kind between objects. Imagine that two astronauts in space are outside their ship. One is working on the ship; she is hammering on the outer hull to remove a dent. The other astronaut is out on a spacewalk, attached to the ship by a long rope. Can he hear the sound of hammering? Why or why not? Could his rope be used to carry sound? Why or why not? Justify your answer with your science knowledge.

    5th Grade - 

    Advanced Learning Opportunities that are Non- Digital

    Poor Kitty! – Can you make balloons stick to a cat, without using glue, tape, clips, or string? What’s the scientific explanation of why they stick? If the cat could roll around on a dryer sheet, would the balloons still stick? Why or why not? 

    Don’t Give Me Any Static – Static Guard is a product that kills static electricity in clothing. So, if your dress slacks or your favorite skirt sticks to your legs, you can spray Static Guard and they will come unstuck. How do you think it works? Would a sprayer full of water do the same thing? Why or why not?

    I will post some creative assignments and lessons along with Mrs. Williams on Google Classroom.
    Please email me additional ideas you have!